New NCAA event requirements: anti-discrimination laws

The NCAA has set new requirements for cities bidding to host NCAA events in all of its divisions. Cities must have anti-discrimination laws and must show that their environment are welcome and safe for all players and spectators. The new requirements may affect cities that have already been awarded bids as well as cities making future bids for new events.

Source: NCAA – Board of Governors approves anti-discrimination process for championships bids

At its quarterly meeting in Indianapolis, the board adopted a new requirement for sites hosting or bidding on NCAA events in all divisions — from the Men’s and Women’s Final Fours to educational events such as leadership development conferences — to demonstrate how they will provide an environment that is safe, healthy, and free of discrimination, plus safeguards the dignity of everyone involved in the event.

The board’s decision integrates the new requirement into the bidding process for championships, adding it to information already required that outlines available access for people with disabilities and details on playing and practice facilities.

Source: Indy Star – NCAA vote: No Final Fours in cities without anti-discrimination laws

After months of hinting that it would use its athletic power to take a stand against discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity, the NCAA on Wednesday made it official.

The organization’s Board of Governors, at its quarterly meeting in Indianapolis, adopted a new requirement for sites hosting or bidding on NCAA events in all divisions — from Final Fours to educational conferences.

Those host cities must “demonstrate how they will provide an environment that is safe, healthy and free of discrimination, plus safeguards the dignity of everyone involved in the event,” the NCAA said.

The board’s decision makes it a requirement in the bidding process for championships, just as it has requirements for access for people with disabilities and details on playing and practice facilities.

Among the laws in cities the NCAA would shy away from are those that allow businesses and organizations to refuse to provide services based on a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity, the organization said.

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